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Intrepid Research Joined TikTok: Here's What Happened Next

Despite company denials, CCP censorship and propaganda blatantly evident on platform

 

Recently, as a social media experiment, we joined the Chinese-owned social media platform TikTok. We wanted to post anti-communist videos directed at the Chinese Communist Party regime to see if we could get a following on the app.


Instead, blatant evidence of CCP censorship emerged and our account was quickly shutdown. We were temporarily banned after two days and permanently banned after three days. What we observed during that time was interesting, and troubling.





A video showing footage from Tiananmen Square on June 4, 1989 was removed for "violent and graphic content." (Of course, the violence depicted was committed by the Communist Chinese government).

A video parody of Xi Jinping as Winnie the Pooh was removed for "harassment and bullying."

Another video parody of Xi Jinping as Winnie the Pooh could not be uploaded.

A music video of Miles Guo's "Fight for Hong Kong" could not be uploaded.

Our account was temporarily suspended from being able to post for 24 hours.


Multiple pro-CCP accounts posted comments and propaganda on our account under an anti-Xi Jinping video and an anti-CCP video.

All of this happened in just the first few hours of the account's existence. All of which you would expect from a CCP-monitored and censored platform.


Baffled Americans on the platform are constantly complaining about censored posts and banned accounts. Posts and accounts are routinely taken down by the site for all sorts of reasons. The CCP's digital army of commenters or AI-bots, or whatever they are, are all over it. On one post that we put up, someone commented "Xi is savior of the world." On another, "Uyghurs live in 5 star resorts." On another, "CCP forever."


Of course, TikTok claims that its platform is not monitored and censored by its masters in the CCP, but as we all know, you can't trust communists.


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